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20131202
20131210
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CSPAN2 6
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Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13 (some duplicates have been removed)
president kennedy's senate career benefit him as president? >> he understood foreign policy issues very role with the good schooling yet developed an appreciation of how congress works. he spent 40 years there. and exactly the second u.s. senator to win the presidency before him it was of the warren harding 1920 and since then is barack obama 2008. that is not unnatural jumping off point but kennedy could use it to advance his ambition of. >> host: the book is jfk and the senate. [applause] thank you for that lovely introduction. and also for coming out on a school might. i know how hard it is to do that if you have kids or not. also for postdate this event i would like to make a quick plug if you have any changes in your pocket by a book to support your local independent bookstore.
the great society indeed and commitment that johnson had. because kennedy was essentially a foreign policy president. he used to say politics can ncj, but foreign policy can kill you. he would have gotten i think it would've run against barry goldwater, he would have won a big victory the way johnson it. he would have carried big majorities, democratic majorities into the house and senate i think. and i think he would've gotten the big tax cut, the federal aid to education, the medicare and the civil rights bills past. that would put them in the lead. the most, the rest of the 20th century presidential reformers, alongside of tr and wilson and even compared somewhat to fdr. i don't think he would have pushed beyond that. i think he would've pushed toward detente. i think we would have seen they don't earlier with kennedy family did with richard nixon, because that cuban missile crisis was so sobering, sobering for khrushchev, too. and then, of course, they made the nuclear test ban treaty which eliminated the pollution and radiation in the atmosphere, and i think kennedy saw this as an ope
-- american citizens take government officials who nor this reality when they pushed their foreign-policy agendas based on this. guest: thank you for your question and i disagree with your premise, which is that the world trade center was an inside job with explosives. there are the studies out there and it is pretty clear that the -- those buildings were attacked by planes that were hijacked by al qaeda operatives. i know there is a continuing conspiracy theory community out there that think this was some sort of nefarious scheme to -- it is hard to take of things seriously. i know you may genuinely believe it but i encourage you to go out there and engage in debates. i don't think the conspiracy theory holds any water. host: maurice from ohio, democrat's line. i have a question about -- let's sayear tomorrow they have a nuclear bomb. whatd of want to know would be the consequence, what the world would do about it as compared to pakistan having a nuclear bone, india having a nuclear bomb. what will the u.s. or the rest of the world do if iran says they have a nuclear bomb today? that is
. she was a foreign policy adviser to both ted kennedy and mayor bloomberg. she has written a couple of books. and networking on the president's declassification efforts. she knows a lot about those documents. so welcome, nancy. great to be working with you again. [applause] >> we have an exciting panel for you to give you fist hand chance to hear from those authors of the many documents that you've had out here. we're going have a brief discussion from madeline albright, sandy, and leon. they have already been introduced. we're going to have hear from each of them. have a discussion with them, and take a few questions from the audience. and then wrap up around 3:00 and the president will come. let me invite the panel to come up. [applause] m. >> this an on? first i want to thank the clinton library. it's great to see so many old friend. i think the date and peace process is something we are all very proud of to have been part of and stands as president clinton's one of his many lasting legacies. and the legacy is today bosnia is a moment ethnic and democratic state. i think the team
and a strong presence on foreign policy than a senator from indiana. there was a global push for this from faith leaders and from anti-segregationists here in this country. we heard just now the secretary general of the united nations that no one has done more. no one in our era and generation has done more to fight discrimination than the moral leadership and example of this man who suffered for 27 years yet came out of prison with his wife winnie at his side and she has been imprisoned for 18 months at that time. in the anc, they came out of prison and marched in that march and from then on, his days in prison spoke of reconciliation. for that that he won the nobel prize and went on as he became. he helped sign into law the law that outlawed discrimination against the white minority. that belief in reconciliation that created a new south africa. that was a model for nations for people around the world. >> did he do it with kindness? >> he did it with love and with kindness and wit and humor. when he came here, he so impressed american presidents, we know how close he was with bill clinto
, foreign policy getting the country to do what you want so what are the tools? they are not a lot of tools and the national security toolbox. there is diplomacy on one end and use of force on another and various gradations. sanctions are an important economic tool and a 90s were very much known as the sanctions decade. it was very interesting because one of the other things i did at the u.n. was to make sure sanctions stay is on iraq, the cease-fire had been translated into a series of sanctions and those were very kind of ham handed sanctions, the tougher sanctions on any country at all and what we were looking at was trying to get more surgical with the sanctions on the former yugoslavia. one problem that was there because you put two things together was there was an arms embargo that was put on that and only hurt the country's that seceded from the serbs, the serbs continued, they had a a really huge standing military and the reason that we wanted to lift the embargo on arms was the others weren't getting any. there were two different aspects on that but sanctions are a pool and they do
this foreign policy debates, very active in the discussion about vietnam, algeria, the soviet union. he also did something kind of interesting, he chaired a special committee to determine the five best senators in american history. this was a committee that lyndon johnson created for himself, grew tired of it, handed it off to ken kennedy -- kennedy. so this was in some sense the one project that kennedy was in charge of during his senate career. he took it very seriously, you know, inquired of all the great historians in the country and spent six, seven months really digging into this, came up with a list of the five greatest senators, and it was something that became part of his identity as being a young politician, but also someone very steeped in american history. so -- >> who came out at the top of that list? >> el, there was robert taft and robert concern. [inaudible] were the two 20th century ones. but the big ones were john calhoun, daniel webster, henry clay. the great triumvirate of the pre-civil war era. so kennedy's committee quickly decided on the top three, webster, clay, calho
work on northern ireland. she was a foreign-policy adviser to the ted kennedy and i think mayor bloomberg on the right? an interesting combination. and she's written a couple of books, good books, and she is now working on the president's declassification efforts. so she knows a lot about those documents. so, welcome, nancy. great to be working with you again. [applause] >> we have an exciting panel for you, to give you first hand a chance to hear from those authors of the many documents that you have had out here. we are going to have a brief discussion from that of an albright -- madeleine albright. i won't take your time and introducing of them again. we will have a little discussion with them and then take a few questions from the audience and then wrap it up abou around 3:0t which point we will have a short break and then the president will come so let me invite the panel to come up. [applause] >> is this on? first we want to thank the clinton library and obviously stephanie streett. the peace process is something that we are all proud of. it one of his many lasting legacie
the significant nature of the shift in american foreign policy that we are seeing laid out before us . i would be honored to recognize my colleague and friend, the gentleman from california, mr. sherman. mr. sherman: i thank the gentleman for yielding. the political pund its are focused on -- pund its, are focused on was this a good deal or a bad deal. we aren't here to give a grade to the administration. we are here in congress to decide what legislation should be passed. congress is a policy-making body, although so often those in the administration think that we are, at most, advisers or critics. but let's take a look at this deal and we'll see that what we get out of it is at least overstated by its proponents. because we are told that this halts their enrichment of uranium. it is true that it limits their 20% uranium. and iran will not be making progress during the six-month period of this deal toward its first bomb. but they will be making very substantial progress toward their eighth, ninth and tenth bomb and iran is not a nuclear power until they have some to hide, one to two to test.
of one of obama's hidden foreign policy initiatives over the past five years. he is had secret negotiations me, the israelis, excuse with the radians, and we have seen him at the same time alienate many of our allies in the media it's -- in the mideast. doesn't this act is a clever ploy to keep the israelis from attacking and defending their own national interest -- >> the secret meetings with iranians, where'd you get that from? caller: that was in the press this past week. nott: the meetings have .een anything but on the p5+1 what you're talking about now is making sure and verifying, the whole idea was for iran to not having nuclear weapons. if we had gone in this manner before with iraq, where we railroad -- were able to go and massy no weapons of instruction there, let defectors go where they want unfettered, then maybe we would have been able to avoid the thousands of , thecan lives that we lost devastation to our economy that we had. cy as go, give diplomas chance. if in fact around does not live up to the agreement, we have 20 of time and the ability to do -- toings, to
approach to foreign policy. netanyahu has said recently, rouhani has an iron fist sheathed by a velvet glove. rouhani was a nuclear negotiator, and he even bragged that he had used at the cover to advance iran's nuclear efforts. while he may be president, he is not the supreme leader, which is khamenei. the guy who at the end of the day really controls the shots is ali khamenei. rouhani was chosen by a special, very small group that khamenei had picked. they chose acceptable candidates within a narrow band of political thought. i think people do, people i work with look forward to the day when people in iran have a genuine choice between alternatives politically, but they are a long way from it. to your point, in terms of how much wiggle room rouhani has, the iranians have two big goals. >> you can watch the rest of this online at the c-span video library. we will move onto the willard hotel for remarks by secretary of state on kerry at the brookings institution save and -- brookingsisrael forum onon save anban u.s.-israel relations. >> thank you for the generous introduction and for t
and close ally make an instant and domestic and foreign business community. amy team to beat the conditions to develop the private sectors and facilitate investment in time the noun they thus far and the cia have prevented many recommendations of the policy makers have the garden section effective banking arm of the art infrastructure education among out that the idf will be folded in half and conceded at the upcoming ad vietnam development partnerships fund which will be called if there's a telling me how talking on her face. if you commemorate the anniversary of the atv nothing of the non banking market union bill to place it in the national historical site and into the city burning province more than three hundred people attended the dance. the event was marked by the unveiling of the eighteen year high bronze statue of many teaching that though. the incident though the idea of term limits in school you get the prize giving these booties and a view them with a sound that he's making a poster to unesco for recognition which an in built at the words coach with the gear and clothing into co
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13 (some duplicates have been removed)